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Alignment of divisions

As explained in the section Divisions, all our editions are built around <div>sections, which are of two types:

  • Divisions canonical divisions in which a work is internally structured. If it is an epic poem, in books; if it is a dramatic work, in dialogical parts, chorales, subdivisions of each of these, etc.; if it is a prose work, in books, chapters, subchapters, etc. (cf. Divisions) That is, the number of <div> main and secondary divisions that structure each work will depend on the internal structure that each work has.
  • Divisions for the table of contents (cf. Table of Contents). These subdivisions will be established by each editor as they wish, in order to create a table of contents that allows easy browsing through each file when viewed on screen. We will always try to match as closely as possible the canonical divisions of each text, but in the case of very long texts (such as epic texts, whose minimum canonical division is the book, always with more than 500 verses), it will be necessary to create "artificial" divisions, of no more than 50-70 verses, so that excessively long texts do not appear on screen all at once.

All these divisions will have to have a unique and exclusive @xml:id based on the canonical numbering that corresponds to them, and with the prefix of the language of the text, as we saw in the articles on the structure of each text type.

In order to establish a correct alignment between the original text and the translations, each of them must include a <div> structure identical to that of the original text, both the canonical divisions and the custom divisions that we have included in the original structure, in the same order and in their entirety.

The @xml:id of the divisions in the translations must also correspond exactly, and only the language prefix will change in each one.

An example of an edition of a Greek text with two translations, into Spanish and Italian:

<text>
	<group>
		<text type="source" xml:lang="grc" xml:id="grc">
			<body>
				<div n="3" type="book" xml:id="grc.3">
					<head>Liber tertius</head>
					<div type="chapter" n="4" xml:id="grc.3.4">
						<head>Capitulum quartum</head>
						<div type="section" n="1" xml:id="grc.3.4.1">
							<head>4.1</head>
							<p>Κάδμος δὲ ἀποθανοῦσαν θάψας Τηλέφασσαν, ὑπὸ Θρᾳκῶν ξενισθείς, ἦλθεν εἰς Δελφοὺς περὶ τῆς Εὐρώπης πυνθανόμενος. ὁ δὲ θεὸς εἶπε περὶ μὲν Εὐρώπης μὴ πολυπραγμονεῖν, χρῆσθαι δὲ καθοδηγῷ βοΐ, καὶ πόλιν κτίζειν ἔνθα αὕτη πέσῃ καμοῦσα. … </p>
						</div>
					</div>
				</div>
			</body>
		</text>
		<text type="translation" xml:lang="es" xml:id="es">
			<body>
				<div n="3" type="book" xml:id="es.3">
					<head>Libro tercero</head>
					<div type="chapter" n="4" xml:id="es.3.4">
						<head>Capítulo cuarto</head>
						<div type="section" n="1" xml:id="es.3.4.1">
							<head>4.1</head>
							<p>Cadmo enterró a Telefasa tras su muerte y, después de ser hospedado por los tracios, se marchó hacia Delfos para indagar sobre Europa. El dios le respondió que no se preocupase por Europa, que era necesario que condujese una vaca y que fundase una ciudad allí donde esta cayese fatigada. … </p>
						</div>
					</div>
				</div>
			</body>
		</text>
		<text type="translation" xml:lang="it" xml:id="it">
			<body>
				<div n="3" type="book" xml:id="it.3">
					<head>Terzo libro</head>
					<div type="chapter" n="4" xml:id="it.3.4">
						<head>Quarto capitolo</head>
						<div type="section" n="1" xml:id="it.3.4.1">
							<head>4.1</head>
							<p>Quando morì Telefassa, Cadmo la seppellì; fu ospitato dai Traci, poi andò a Delfi per chiedere di Europa. Il dio gli disse di non preoccuparsi per lei, ma di prendere come guida una vacca e fondare una città là dove questa, presa da stanchezza, si fosse accosciata. … </p>
						</div>
					</div>
				</div>
			</body>
		</text>
	</group>
</text>

In the example we can see that this prose work is divided into books, chapters and sections. That is, into <div type="book">, divided in <div type="chapter"> that include <div type="section">. All these divisions have a canonical numbering (which has to be included in the @nnumber– attribute), but which, in order for alignment to happen, is detailed in an @xml:id.

And each @xml:id is identical to its corresponding one in the other languages, but with its own language prefix. Thus, for the book <div n="3" type="book" xml:id="grc.3"> we have the corresponding translations <div n="3" type="book" xml:id="es.3"> and <div n="3" type="book" xml:id="it.3">, with the same @xml:id of value "3", but with the prefix of the corresponding language: "grc.3", "es.3" and "it.3". This system is used with the rest of the <div> into which the text is divided. (Cf. códigos de idioma).

The example also shows that each <div> that we want to appear in the table of contents must carry as the first tag <head> (cf. <head>).

The same system applies to the non-canonical <div> into which we divide our text to generate entries in the table of contents. They must also be numbered unequivocally in the @xml:id and an identifying <head> must be added to them. For example, in the case of a book from Ovid's Metamorphoses :

<text>
	<group>
		<text type="source" xml:lang="la" xml:id="la">
			<body>
				<div type="book" n="3" xml:id="la.3">
					<head>Liber Tertius</head>
					<div type="tale" n="Cadmus" xml:id="la.3.cadmus">
						<head>Cadmus (1-137)</head>
						<div xml:id="la.3.cadmus.1">
							<head>1-27<</head>
							<p>
								<l n="1">Iamque deus posita fallacis imagine tauri</l>
								<l n="2">se confessus erat Dictaeaque rura tenebat,</l>
								…
							</p>
						</div>
					</div>
				</div>
			</body>
		</text>
		<text type="translation" xml:lang="es" xml:id="es">
			<body>
				<div type="book" n="3" xml:id="es.3">
					<head>Libro Tercero</head>
					<div type="tale" n="Cadmus" xml:id="es.3.cadmus">
						<head>Cadmo (1-137)</head>
						<div xml:id="es.3.cadmus.1">
							<head>1-27</head>
							<p>Ya el dios, abandonada la apariencia del engañador toro, había confesado quién era y se encontraba en los campos Dicteos, … </p>
						</div>
					</div>
				</div>
			</body>
		</text>
	</group>
</text>

The canonical divisions of Ovid's text end with the book number, then move on to the verse number. But we may want to divide the text into the episodes or tales of which it is composed (<div type="tale" n="Cadmus" xml:id="la.3.Cadmus">, for example), and assign them a @n in order to name them and a @xml:id that identifies them. Each of these "tales", being composed of hundreds of verses, can be divided into subdivisions as we wish. In the example, the first division goes from verse 1 to 27. And so on.

In this case, the original text is in verse, but the translation is in prose. This is not a problem, since the <div> into which we divide it must be identical in both formats. In prose, the <p> do not have further divisions; in poetry, each verse will always be inside its <l> with its canonical @n . (Cf. <p> and <l>). But since the translation cannot be established completely parallel, verse by verse, we do not create <l> in the translations, since they would never be fully equivalent.

The system is identical, whether they are canonical or custom divisions, and must be constant for all translations of which the edition is composed.

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